Stimulation

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Stimulation can be described as an increase in a person's physical energy levels which are interpreted as encouraging when it comes to wakefulness, movement, performing tasks, talkativeness, and general exercise.[1][2][3]

At lower levels, stimulation typically presents itself as encouraged more so than forced. This can be described as feeling distinctly energetic, but in a purely controllable fashion that does not overwhelm the person with involuntary movements should they choose to stop expending large amounts of energy. It is often accompanied by other coinciding effects such as motivation enhancement, analysis enhancement, thought acceleration, focus enhancement, and appetite suppression in a manner which can result in a distinct increase in the person's overall productivity.

At higher levels, stimulation typically presents itself as forced more so than encouraged. This can be described as the effects of increased energy becoming so pronounced that the person will be incapable of relaxing and will feel an irresistible urge to perform some sort of physical task. It is often accompanied by other coinciding effects such as thought disorganization, focus suppression, short term memory suppression, increased heart rate, teeth grinding, temporary erectile dysfunction, sweating, and dehydration in a manner which can lead to lead to a distinct decrease in the person's overall productivity.

Stimulation is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of stimulant compounds, particularly dopaminergic stimulants such as amphetamine, methylphenidate, MDMA, and cocaine. However, it may also occur under the influence of other compounds such as certain psychedelics and certain dissociatives.

Psychoactive substances

Compounds within our psychoactive substance index which may cause this effect include:


Experience reports

Anecdotal reports which describe this effect within our experience index include:

See also

External links

References

  1. Stimulation (PsychologyDictionary) | https://psychologydictionary.org/stimulation/
  2. Stimulation definition | https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stimulate
  3. Chapter 2—How Stimulants Affect the Brain and Behavior (Treatment for Stimulant Use Disorders) | https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64328/