3,4-CTMP

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Summary sheet: 3,4-CTMP
3,4-CTMP
3,4-CTMP.svg
Chemical Nomenclature
Common names 3,4-CTMP
Substitutive name 3,4-Dichloromethylphenidate
Systematic name Methyl 2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(piperidin-2-yl)acetate
Class Membership
Psychoactive class Stimulant
Chemical class Phenidate / Piperidine
Routes of Administration

WARNING: Always start with lower doses due to differences between individual body weight, tolerance, metabolism, and personal sensitivity. See responsible use section.



Oral
Dosage
Threshold Common Heavy
2 - 2 - 4 - - mg
Light Strong
Threshold < 2 mg
Light 2 - 4 mg
Common 4 - 6 mg
Heavy 6 mg +
Duration
Total 6 - 18 hours
Onset 1 - 2 hours
After effects 2 - 24 hours









DISCLAIMER: PW's dosage information is gathered from users and resources for educational purposes only. It is not a recommendation and should be verified with other sources for accuracy.

3,4-Dichloromethylphenidate (also known by the incorrectly abbreviated name 3,4-CTMP) is a stimulant substance of the phenidate class. It is a structural analog of methylphenidate (Ritalin). The two substances have similar pharmacological profiles but different subjective effects.

It is approximately seven times more potent than methylphenidate in animal studies[citation needed], but likely has weaker reinforcing effects due to its slower onset of action.[citation needed] According to anecdotal reports, the active dose of 3,4-CTMP is approximately 10 times lower than the dose of methylphenidate to achieve a similar effect. 3,4-CTMP has a duration of 6 to 18 hours rather than the 4 to 6 hour duration found with methylphenidate.

3,4-CTMP has an extremely short history of human recreational use and has yet to be documented being sold on the streets. It is available for sale as grey market research chemical by online vendors.[citation needed]

Due to its potent stimulant effects, habit-forming properties as well as an unknown toxicity profile, it is strongly recommended that one use proper harm reduction practices if using with this substance.

Chemistry

3,4-CTMP, or 3,4-dichloromethylphenidate, is a synthetic molecule of the substituted phenethylamine class. It contains a phenethylamine core featuring a phenyl ring bound to an amino -NH2 group through an ethyl chain. It is structurally similar to amphetamine, featuring a substitution at Rα which is incorporated into a piperidine ring ending at the terminal amine of the phenethylamine chain. Additionally, it contains a methyl acetate bound to R2 of its structure and is chlorinated at R3 and R4 of its phenyl ring.

3,4-CTMP is nearly identical in structure to methylphenidate; the difference is that it contains two chlorine atoms bonded to the phenyl group at the 3 and 4 positions.

Pharmacology

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3,4-CTMP acts as a dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, meaning it effectively boosts the levels of dopamine and norepinephrine neurotransmitters in the brain by binding to and partially blocking the transporter proteins that normally remove those monoamines from the synaptic cleft. This allows dopamine and norepinephrine to accumulate within the brain, resulting in stimulating and euphoric effects.[1] 3,4-CTMP has also been identified as a relatively potent agonist of 5-HT2B serotonin receptors.[2] This is concerning, as agonism of the 5-HT2B receptors results in a potentially serious effect called pulmonary hypertension, where the pulmonary artery that pumps blood from the heart to the lungs constricts. Additionally, chronic stimulation of 5-HT2B receptors has been implicated in serious heart valve disease via fibrosis. Other drugs with this effect, such as aminorex (a pharmaceutical weight loss drug that was pulled from the market), have resulted in a large number of long term heart injuries and fatalities across the world.

Subjective effects

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As such, it may contain incomplete or wrong information and is still in progress.

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The effects listed below are based upon the subjective effects index and personal experiences of PsychonautWiki contributors. The listed effects should be taken with a grain of salt and will rarely (if ever) occur all at once, but heavier doses will increase the chances and are more likely to induce a full range of effects. Likewise, adverse effects become much more likely on higher doses and may include serious injury or death.

Physical effects
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Visual effects
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Cognitive effects
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After effects
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Toxicity and harm potential

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This toxicity and harm potential section is a stub.

As such, it may contain incomplete or even dangerously wrong information. You can help by expanding upon or correcting it.
We also recommend that you practice diligent independent research and the most thorough harm reduction practices when using this substance.

The toxicity and long-term health effects of recreational 3,4-CTMP use do not seem to have been studied in any scientific context, and the exact toxic dosage is unknown. This is because 3,4-CTMP is a research chemical with very little history of human usage.

Although anecdotal evidence from people who have tried 3,4-CTMP suggests that there are unlikely to be negative health effects attributed to simply trying the substance by itself at low to moderate doses, the agonist activity it displays for the 5-HT2B receptor is a cause for concern, as acute 5-HT2B agonism has been shown to result in a potentially dangerous and largely asymptomatic effect called pulmonary hypertension.[citation needed] Moreover, the long-term stimulation of 5-HT2B receptors has been shown to lead to fibrosis of the heart valves, which may result in stroke and/or severe, permanent heart disease.[4]

Other substances that display this activity, such as the recalled weight-loss drug aminorex, have caused serious and often fatal heart disease when used for even relatively short periods of time.[citation needed] It is highly recommended that, should one choose to use this substance despite these concerns, it only be taken very sparingly and in low doses. Those with cardiovascular diseases of any kind should not consume this substance. Independent research should always be done to ensure that a combination of two or more substances is safe before consumption.

Extreme caution must be taken when managing one's 3,4-CTMP usage as the duration of its stimulating effects can be very long, which can cause unwanted sleep inhibition. This should be considered when redosing as the physically stimulating effects of a dose may persist after the psychological effects have worn off. A user attempting to maintain a state of euphoria may run the risk of accumulating medically dangerous quantities of the substance in their bloodstream.

It is strongly recommended that one not insufflate 3,4-CTMP as it has a low solubility in water so is not readily absorbed through the nasal mucus membrane and anecdotal reports suggest that insufflation of the substance is painful and potentially extremely caustic.[citation needed] Additionally, the poor adsorption by the nasal mucus membrane often results in the majority of the substance slowly entering the stomach through a post-nasal drip, making the onset duration even longer, which may increase the chance of an 'accidental overdose' if one redoses more due to a lack of effect.

It is strongly recommended that one use harm reduction practices when choosing to use this substance.

Tolerance and addiction potential

In terms of its tolerance, many users have reported that 3,4-CTMP can be used for multiple days in a row for extended periods of time without any noticeable acute tolerance build up, instead increasing gradually over regular and extended use. Unusually, there are some reports indicating a sudden rise in tolerance after an extended period of relatively little increase. This results in the user requiring an increase in dosage to achieve the same effects or to remain functional. Increasing dose to match tolerance places one at high risk of addiction.

It has been reported that 3,4-CTMP has potential for abuse on par with that of amphetamine or MDMA due to its lack of significant tolerance, euphoric effects and action upon dopamine transporters.[citation needed]

Dangerous interactions

Although many psychoactive substances are safe on their own, they can become dangerous and even life-threatening when combined with other substances. The list below contains some common potentially dangerous combinations, but may not include all of them. Certain combinations may be safe in low doses of each but still increase the potential risk of death. Independent research should always be done to ensure that a combination of two or more substances is safe before consumption.

Legal status

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As such, it may contain incomplete or wrong information. You can help by expanding it.

  • United Kingdom - 3,4-Dichloromethylphenidate is a class B drug in the UK as of 31st May 2017 and is illegal to possess, produce or supply. [6]
  • United States - 3,4-Dichloromethylphenidate is not explicitly controlled in the US, but it could possibly be considered an analog of a Schedule II substance (methylphenidate) under the Federal Analog Act.
  • Sweden - 3,4-Dichloromethylphenidate is illegal as of 10 November 2014.[7]
  • China - As of October 2015 3,4-CTMP is a controlled substance in China.[8]

See also

External links

References

  1. Davies, HM; Hopper, DW; Hansen, T; Liu, Q; Childers, SR (2004). "Synthesis of methylphenidate analogues and their binding affinities at dopamine and serotonin transport sites". Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters. 14 (7): 1799–802. doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2003.12.097
  2. Arunotayanun, W. (2014). Chemical and biological studies on natural and synthetic Novel Psychoactive Substances. University College London (University of London). http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.626627
  3. Arunotayanun, W. (2014). Chemical and biological studies on natural and synthetic Novel Psychoactive Substances. University College London (University of London). http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.626627
  4. Huang, X. P., Setola, V., Yadav, P. N., Allen, J. A., Rogan, S. C., Hanson, B. J., ... & Roth, B. L. (2009). Parallel functional activity profiling reveals valvulopathogens are potent 5-hydroxytryptamine2B receptor agonists: implications for drug safety assessment. Molecular Pharmacology, 76(4), 710-722. https://doi.org/10.1161/01.CIR.102.23.2836
  5. Gillman, P. K. (2005). Monoamine oxidase inhibitors, opioid analgesics and serotonin toxicity. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 95(4), 434-441. https://doi.org/10.1093/bja/aei210
  6. The Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 (Amendment) Order 2017 (Legislation.gov.uk) | http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2017/634/made
  7. Cannabinoider föreslås bli klassade som hälsofarlig var | http://www.folkhalsomyndigheten.se/nyheter-och-press/nyhetsarkiv/2014/november/cannabinoider-foreslas-bli-klassade-som-halsofarlig-vara/
  8. http://www.sfda.gov.cn/WS01/CL0056/130753.html | 关于印发《非药用类麻醉药品和精神药品列管办法》的通知