Pattern recognition enhancement

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Face in a cloud by Neil Usher - This image serves as an example of pattern recognition enhancement.

Pattern recognition enhancement can be described as an increase in a person's ability to recognise significant imagery (usually faces) within vague stimuli.

This innate ability which human beings possess in everyday life is referred to by the scientific literature as pareidolia and is a very well documented phenomenon.[1][2][3] Common examples of this include spotting faces in everyday objects or perhaps viewing clouds as a variety of potentially different objects.

During this experience, pareidolia can become significantly more intense and pronounced than it would usually be during everyday sober living. For example, scenery may look remarkably like detailed images, every day objects may look like faces and clouds may appear as fantastical objects, all without any visual alterations actually taking place. Once an image has been perceived within an object or landscape, the mind may further exaggerate this recognition through the hallucinatory effect known as transformations so that it goes beyond pareidolia and becomes a standard visual hallucination.

Image examples


Psychoactive substances

Compounds within our psychoactive substance index which may cause this effect include:


Psychoactive substances

Anecdotal reports which describe this effect within our experience index include:


See also


References

  1. Seeing Jesus in toast: Neural and behavioral correlates of face pareidolia | http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010945214000288
  2. Pareidolia in Infants | http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0118539
  3. Why People See Faces When There Are None: Pareidolia (psychology today) | https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/how-think-neandertal/201608/why-people-see-faces-when-there-are-none-pareidolia