Visual suppressions

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Visual suppressions can be defined as any effect which worsens one's ability to percieve the external environment through their sense of sight.

This page lists and describes the various visual suppressions which can occur under the influence of certain psychoactive compounds.

Double vision

Main article: Double vision

Double vision can be the described as the experience of duplicated vision[1][2] similar to that which occurs when one crosses their eyes. Depending on the intensity, this effect can result in a reduced ability to function and perform basic tasks which necessitate the use of sight.

The effect can easily be suppressed by simply closing one eye. This suggests that the effect may be occurring because the brain is simply overlaying the data received from both eyes on top of each other without rendering the information into a singular 3-dimensional image as it normally would during everyday life.

Double vision is often accompanied by other coinciding effects such as acuity suppression[3] and pattern recognition suppression. This effect is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of depressant and dissociative compounds, such as alcohol, quetiapine, ketamine, and DXM.

Image examples

Pattern recognition suppression

Pattern recognition suppression can be described as a partial to complete inability to mentally process visual information regardless of its clarity. For example, although one may be able to see what is in front of them in perfect detail, they will have a reduced ability to understand what they are looking at. This can render even the most common of everyday objects as unrecognizable.

Pattern recognition suppression is often accompanied by other coinciding effects such as analysis suppression and thought deceleration. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of dissociative or antipsychotic compounds, such as ketamine, quetiapine, PCP, and DXM. However, it can also occur to a lesser extent under the influence of extremely heavy dosages of psychedelic compounds such as LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline.

Vibrating vision

Main article: Vibrating vision
Involuntary eye movements

Vibrating vision, also known as nystagmus, can be described as the experience of constant, rapid involuntary eye movements in which the eyes shift from left to right in such quick succession that the person's vision begins to vibrate and blur. This can severely impair vision and result in a reduced ability to function and perform basic tasks which necessitate the use of sight.

Vibrating vision is often accompanied and enhanced by other coinciding effects such as stimulation and thought acceleration. It is most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of stimulant compounds, such as MDMA, amphetamine, and 4-FA.

Acuity suppression

Main article: Acuity suppression
Blurry London by Josikins - This image serves as an accurate replication of acuity suppression as seen from the golden jubilee footbridge in central London.

Acuity suppression can be described as the experience of a person's sense of vision becoming partially to completely blurred and indistinct.[4][5][6][7] This effect may affect the entirety of the person's vision or specific sections of it. Depending on its intensity, this can often result in a reduced ability to function and perform basic tasks which necessitate the use of sight.

Acuity suppression is often accompanied by other coinciding effects such as double vision[8] and pattern recognition suppression. This effect is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of depressant and dissociative compounds, such as alcohol, quetiapine, ketamine, and DXM.

Frame rate suppression

Frame rate suppression can be described as a perceived reduction in the speed at which visual information is processed. While under the influence of this effect one may feel as if their vision is lagging and displaying in a manner similar to a buffering video, computer monitor, or strobe light.

Frame rate suppression is often accompanied by other coinciding effects such as acuity suppression and double vision. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of dissociative compounds, such as ketamine, MXE, PCP, and DXM.

See also

References

  1. Watts, A. This Is It. New York: Pantheon Books, Inc., 1960.
  2. Marsh, A. (1979). Visual hallucinations during hallucinogenic experience and schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 5(4), 628. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/5.4.627
  3. Smith, J. L., & Buncic, J. R. (1999). Drugs which can affect near vision: a useful list. American Orthoptic Journal, 49, 180-190. https://uwpress.wisc.edu/journals/pdfs/AOJ_49_178.pdf
  4. Hollister L. E. (1984). Effects of hallucinogens in humans,” in Hallucinogens: Neurochemical, Behavioral and Clinical Perspectives, ed Jacobs B. L., editor. (New York, NY: Raven Press), 19–33.
  5. Masters R. E. L. (1966). The Varieties of Psychedelic Experience. New York, NY: Henry Holt & Company, Inc.
  6. Nichols D. E. (2004). Hallucinogens. Pharmacol. Ther. 101, 131–181. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pharmthera.2003.11.002
  7. Gallimore, A. R. (2015). Restructuring consciousness–the psychedelic state in light of integrated information theory. Frontiers in human neuroscience, 9, 346. https://dx.doi.org/10.3389%2Ffnhum.2015.00346
  8. Smith, J. L., & Buncic, J. R. (1999). Drugs which can affect near vision: a useful list. American Orthoptic Journal, 49, 180-190. https://uwpress.wisc.edu/journals/pdfs/AOJ_49_178.pdf