Talk:Z-drug

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It may contain incorrect information, particularly with respect to dosage, duration, subjective effects, toxicity and other risks.

Z-drugs are a group of hypnotic nonbenzodiazepine drugs with effects similar to benzodiazepines, which are used in the treatment of insomnia, and most of whose names start with the letter "Z".

History and culture

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Z-drugs emerged in the late 1980's to early 1990's, with Zopiclone approved by the British National Health Service in 1989, soon followed by Zolpidem.

Chemistry

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Pharmacology

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There are 3 primary groups of Z-drugs that are listed below

Subjective effects

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Cognitive effects
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Medical use

Z-drugs are often prescribed to treat insomnia.

Toxicity and harm potential

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We also recommend that you conduct independent research and use harm reduction practices when using this substance.

Z-drugs are known for dangerous and bizarre behavioral changes. This makes z-drugs very dangerous, as the behavior changes can result in violence, Suicidal ideation, and a complete loss of inhibition. They can also put the user in a sleepwalking-like state. To lessen the likelihood of these behavioral changes, one should take a light dose when using recreational, and avoid being around other people while under the influence of a z-drug.

It is strongly recommended that one use harm reduction practices when using this substance.

Tolerance and addiction potential

Z-drugs are extremely addictive with a high potential for abuse, similar to Benzodiazepines.

Dangerous interactions

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Although many psychoactive substances are reasonably safe to use on their own, they can quickly become dangerous or even life-threatening when taken with other substances. The following lists some known dangerous combinations, but cannot be guaranteed to include all of them. Independent research should always be conducted to ensure that a combination of two or more substances is safe to consume. Some interactions listed have been sourced from TripSit.

  • Stimulants - It can be dangerous to combine depressants with stimulants due to the risk of accidental excessive intoxication. Stimulants mask the sedative effect of depressants, which is the main factor most people use to gauge their level of intoxication. Once the stimulant effects wear off, the effects of the depressant will significantly increase, leading to intensified disinhibition, motor control loss, and dangerous black-out states. This combination can also potentially result in severe dehydration if one's fluid intake is not closely monitored. If choosing to combine these substances, one should strictly limit themselves to a pre-set schedule of dosing only a certain amount per hour until a maximum threshold has been reached.

See also

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Literature

References