Talk:Chloroform

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Summary sheet: Chloroform
Chloroform
Trichloromethane.svg
Chemical Nomenclature
Common names Chloroform, Trichloromethane
Class Membership
Psychoactive class Dissociative / Depressants
Routes of Administration

WARNING: Always start with lower doses due to differences between individual body weight, tolerance, metabolism, and personal sensitivity. See responsible use section.

Inhaled
Dosage
Duration
Total 3 - 8 minutes
Onset 0 - 1 minutes
Peak 15 - 30 seconds
Offset 1 - 5 minutes
After effects 15 - 30 minutes











DISCLAIMER: PW's dosage information is gathered from users and resources for educational purposes only. It is not a recommendation and should be verified with other sources for accuracy.

Interactions


Chloroform (also known as trichloromethane), is an organic compound with formula CHCl3. It is a colorless, strong-smelling, dense liquid. It is a volatile solvent that was used as a medical anesthetic during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It is one of the four chloromethanes and a trihalomethane. It is a powerful anesthetic, euphoriant, anxiolytic and sedative when inhaled or ingested.[1]

History and culture

The anaesthetic qualities of chloroform were first described in 1842 in a thesis by Robert Mortimer Glover, which won the Gold Medal of the Harveian Society for that year. Glover also undertook practical experiments on dogs to prove his theories. Glover further refined his theories and presented them in the thesis for his doctorate at the University of Edinburgh in the summer of 1847. The Scottish obstetrician James Young Simpson was one of the persons required to read the thesis, but later claimed to have never read the thesis and to have come to his conclusions independently.

The use of chloroform during surgery expanded rapidly thereafter in Europe. In the 1850s, chloroform was used by the physician John Snow during the birth of Queen Victoria's last two children. In the United States, chloroform began to replace ether as an anesthetic at the beginning of the 20th century; however, it was quickly abandoned in favor of ether upon discovery of its toxicity, especially its tendency to cause fatal cardiac arrhythmia analogous to what is now termed "sudden sniffer's death". Some people used chloroform as a recreational drug or to attempt suicide.[2]

Use of chloroform as an incapacitating agent has become widely recognized, bordering on clichéd, due to the popularity of crime fiction authors having criminals use chloroform-soaked rags to render victims unconscious. However, it is nearly impossible to incapacitate someone using chloroform in this manner.[3] It takes at least five minutes of inhaling an item soaked in chloroform to render a person unconscious. Most criminal cases involving chloroform also involve another drug being co-administered, such as alcohol or diazepam, or the victim being found to have been complicit in its administration. After a person has lost consciousness due to chloroform inhalation, a continuous volume must be administered and the chin must be supported to keep the tongue from obstructing the airway, a difficult procedure typically requiring the skills of an anesthesiologist.

Chemistry

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Pharmacology

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Subjective effects

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Disclaimer: The effects listed below cite the Subjective Effect Index (SEI), a research literature based on anecdotal reports and the personal experiences of PsychonautWiki contributors. As a result, they should be regarded with a healthy degree of skepticism. It is worth noting that these effects will not necessarily occur in a predictable or reliable manner, although higher doses are more liable to induce the full spectrum of effects. Likewise, adverse effects become much more likely with higher doses and may include addiction, serious injury, or death.

Physical effects
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Visual effects
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Cognitive effects
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Auditory effects
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After effects
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Experience reports

There are currently 0 experience reports which describe the effects of this substance in our experience index.

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Toxicity and harm potential

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Note: Always conduct independent research and use harm reduction practices if using this substance.

The exact toxic dosage is unknown. Potential problems include:

  • Lack of Oxygen: Brain injury and suffocation can result from lack of oxygen. When used as an anesthetic, chloroform is always administered in combination with oxygen. Never use chloroform in any manner that does not provide for adequate oxygen intake.

It is strongly recommended that one use harm reduction practices when using this substance.

Lethal dosage

Tolerance and addiction potential

Dangerous interactions

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Although many psychoactive substances are reasonably safe to use on their own, they can suddenly become dangerous or even life-threatening when combined with other substances. The following list includes some known dangerous combinations (although it is not guaranteed to include all of them). Independent research (e.g. Google, DuckDuckGo) should always be conducted to ensure that a combination of two or more substances is safe to consume. Some of the listed interactions have been sourced from TripSit.

Legal status

Chloroform is unscheduled in nearly all parts of the world.

See also

External links

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Literature

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References

  1. "Chloroform [MAK Value Documentation, 2000]". The MAK-Collection for Occupational Health and Safety. 2012. pp. 20–58. doi:10.1002/3527600418.mb6766e0014. ISBN 978-3527600410.
  2. Martin, William (3 July 1886). "A Case of Chloroform Poisoning; Recovery". British Medical Journal. 2 (1331): 16–17. doi:10.1136/bmj.2.1331.16-a. PMC 2257365. PMID 20751619.
  3. Payne, J. P. (July 1998). "The criminal use of chloroform". Anaesthesia. 53 (7): 685–690. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2044.1998.528-az0572.x. PMID 9771177. S2CID 1718276.