Talk:DMXE

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Summary sheet: DMXE
DMXE
DMXE.svg
Chemical Nomenclature
Common names DMXE
Substitutive name Deoxymethoxetamine
Systematic name 2-(ethylamino)-2-(3-methylphenyl)cyclohexan-1-one
Class Membership
Psychoactive class Dissociative / Hallucinogen
Chemical class Arylcyclohexylamine
Routes of Administration

WARNING: Always start with lower doses due to differences between individual body weight, tolerance, metabolism, and personal sensitivity. See responsible use section.






Insufflated
Dosage
Threshold 5 mg
Light 5 - 20 mg
Common 20 - 35 mg
Strong 35 - 60 mg
Heavy 60 mg +
Duration
Total 2 - 6 hours
Onset 5 - 15 minutes
Come up 30 - 90 minutes
Peak 1 - 3 hours
Offset 1 - 2 hours






DISCLAIMER: PW's dosage information is gathered from users and resources for educational purposes only. It is not a recommendation and should be verified with other sources for accuracy.

Interactions


Deoxymethoxetamine (also known as DMXE) is a dissociative substance of the arylcyclohexylamine class that produces ketamine-like dissociative effects when administered.

DMXE has been sold online since around October 2022, marketed as a legal replacement for MXE. [1]

Limited data exists about the pharmacological properties, metabolism, and toxicity of DMXE in humans, and it has a limited history of human use. It is highly advised to use harm reduction practices if using this substance.

History and culture

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The compound does not have a clear first synthesis date. DMXE was first reported as being used for recreational purposes in 2020,[2] and has been increasing in popularity as an alternative to the now-banned MXE. It is rarely sold on the streets and is almost exclusively sold as a gray-area research chemical alternative to the more recognizable MXE for recreational and entheogenic purposes.

Chemistry

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DMXE (Deoxymethoxetamine) is an arylcyclohexylamine, similar to PCP and ketamine. It is an analog of MXE (Methoxetamine), but instead of a methoxy in the 3 position it has only a methyl group, hence Deoxy-(without oxygen)-methoxetamine. DMXE lack of an oxygen results in a more hydrophobic and less bulky structure - causing the slight differences in pharmacology.

It is a white crystalline substance at room temperature that is sparingly soluble in ethanol (10mg/ml).[3]

Pharmacology

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DMXE acts as an NMDA receptor antagonist. A specific subtype of glutamate receptor, NMDA (N-Methyl-D-Aspartate), modulates the transmission of electrical signals between neurons in the brain and spinal cord; for the signals to pass, the receptor must be open.

Dissociatives inhibit the normal functioning NMDA receptors by binding to and blocking them. This disruption of neural network activity leads to loss of normal cognitive and affective processing, psychomotor functioning, anesthesia and eventually the equivalent of a "k-hole".

An in silico study showed that DMXE binds to the same site of NMDARs as MXE and posseses comparable potency.

Subjective effects

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Disclaimer: The effects listed below cite the Subjective Effect Index (SEI), an open research literature based on anecdotal user reports and the personal analyses of PsychonautWiki contributors. As a result, they should be viewed with a healthy degree of skepticism.

It is also worth noting that these effects will not necessarily occur in a predictable or reliable manner, although higher doses are more liable to induce the full spectrum of effects. Likewise, adverse effects become increasingly likely with higher doses and may include addiction, severe injury, or death ☠.

Physical effects
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Disconnective effects
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Visual effects
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Experience reports

There are currently 0 experience reports which describe the effects of this substance in our experience index.

Additional experience reports can be found here:

Toxicity and harm potential

The toxicity and long-term health effects of recreational DMXE use do not seem to have been studied in any scientific context and the exact toxic dosage is unknown.

This is because DMXE is a research chemical with a very brief history of human usage.

It is strongly recommended that one use harm reduction practices when using this substance.

Lethal dosage

Tolerance and addiction potential

Dangerous interactions

Warning: Many psychoactive substances that are reasonably safe to use on their own can suddenly become dangerous and even life-threatening when combined with certain other substances. The following list provides some known dangerous interactions (although it is not guaranteed to include all of them).

Always conduct independent research (e.g. Google, DuckDuckGo, PubMed) to ensure that a combination of two or more substances is safe to consume. Some of the listed interactions have been sourced from TripSit.

Due to similarities to other known and similar compounds, it is advised to use their safety profile when it comes to interactions:

  • Alcohol - Both substances cause ataxia and bring a very high risk of vomiting and unconsciousness. If the user falls unconscious while under the influence there is a severe risk of vomit aspiration if they are not placed in the recovery position.
  • GHB / GBL - Both substances cause ataxia and bring a risk of vomiting and unconsciousness. If the user falls unconscious while under the influence there is a severe risk of vomit aspiration if they are not placed in the recovery position.
  • Opioids - Both substances bring a risk of vomiting and unconsciousness. If the user falls unconscious while under the influence there is a severe risk of vomit aspiration if they are not placed in the recovery position.
  • Tramadol - Tramadol lowers the seizure threshold. Both substances increase the risk of vomiting and unconsciousness.
  • Amphetamines - No unexpected interactions, though likely to increase blood pressure (likely not an issue with sensible doses). Moving around on high doses of this combination may be ill-advised due to risk of physical injury.
  • Cocaine - No unexpected interactions, though likely to increase blood pressure (likely not an issue with sensible doses). Moving around on high doses of this combination may be ill-advised due to risk of physical injury.
  • Benzodiazepines - Both substances potentiate the ataxia and sedation caused by the other and can lead to unexpected loss of consciousness at high doses. While unconscious, vomit aspiration is a risk if the user is not placed in the recovery position.
  • Trazodone - When used as a sleep aid and taken close to that of a dose of ketamine, there is a risk of respiratory depression when high amounts of either are consumed.
  • Grapefruit - Grapefruit juice might increase absorption of DMXE. This may result in the user having higher concentrations of DMXE in their system compared to normal. The DMXE may also have a longer duration of effect. This likely applies to oral, sublingual, and intranasal administration.
  • MAOI - MAO-B is known to effect similar substances and their potency. MAOIs in general increase blood pressure, which could cause a spike if both are used.

Legal status

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  • US: DMXE itself is not scheduled, but due to its similarities to now schedule I MXE, one can be prosecuted for under the Federal Analog Act, which states any chemical "substantially similar" to a controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II to be treated as if it were listed in Schedule I, but only if intended for human consumption.

See also

External links

(List along order below)

Literature

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References