Suggestibility suppression

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Suggestibility suppression can be described as a decreased tendency to accept and act on the suggestions of others. A common example of suggestibility supression in action would be a person being unwilling to believe or trust another person's suggestions without a greater amount of prior discussion than would usually be considered necessary during every day sobriety.

Although this effect can occur as a distinct mindstate, it may also arise due to interactions between a number of other effects. For example, a person who is currently experiencing mild paranoia combined with analysis enhancement may find themselves less trusting and more inclined to think through the suggestions of others before acting upon them, alternatively, a person who is experiencing ego inflation may find that they value their own opinion over others and are therefore equally less likely to follow the suggestions of others.

Suggestibility suppression is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of stimulant compounds, particularly dopaminergic stimulants such as methylphenidate, amphetamine, and cocaine.

Psychoactive substances

Compounds within our psychoactive substance index which may cause this effect include:

Experience reports

Anecdotal reports which describe this effect within our experience index include:

See also

External links