Smell and taste effects

From PsychonautWiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Smell and taste effects can be defined as any subjective effect which directly alters either a person's sense of smell or their sense of taste.

This page lists and describes the various auditory effects which can occur under the influence of certain psychoactive compounds.

Gustatory enhancement

Main article: Gustatory enhancement

Gustatory enhancement can be described as the experience of tastes becoming significantly richer, stronger, and more noticeable than that of everyday sobriety. This experience can either be positive or negative depending on the substance, the taste, and the person's prior opinion of the taste. For example, while certain tastes may become a true delight in a manner which results in appetite enhancement, other tastes may become overpowering in an unpleasant manner which can potentially trigger nausea or even vomiting.

Gustatory enhancement is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of psychedelic compounds, such as LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline. However, it can also occur under the influence of cannabinoids and stimulants.

Olfactory enhancement

Main article: Olfactory enhancement

Olfactory enhancement can be described as the experience of smells becoming significantly richer, stronger, and more noticeable than that of everyday sobriety. This experience can either be positive or negative depending on the smell and the person's prior opinion of them. For example, while certain smells such as food or flowers may become a true delight during this experience, other smells such as pollution or body odour may become overpowering in an uncomfortable manner which can potentially trigger nausea and vomiting.

Olfactory enhancement is often accompanied by other coinciding effects such as acuity enhancement, tactile enhancement, and auditory enhancement. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of psychedelic compounds, such as LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline. However, it can also occur to a lesser extent under the influence of certain stimulants and dissociatives such as MDMA or 3-MeO-PCP.

Gustatory hallucinations

Gustatory hallucinations can be described as hallucinations involving the sense of taste. A common example of this is a strong, unpleasant metallic taste in one's mouth. Another example is a strong sweet taste in one's saliva, which makes it taste like molten sugar. These types of hallucinations can cover a wide range of potential tastes and are relatively uncommon compared to other types of hallucinations. They can be either pleasant or unpleasant, depending on the users like or dislike of the given taste.

Gustatory hallucinations are most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as psychedelics, dissociatives, and deliriants.

Olfactory hallucinations

Olfactory hallucinations can be described as the detection or perception of smells that are not actually present in the person's environment. The specific hallucinatory odours which are perceived can vary from person to person and can vary depending on set and setting as well as the dosage. The smells themselves can range from being pleasant to foul in their manifestations and are often described as being odd and sometimes very random in nature.

Olfactory hallucinations are often accompanied by other coinciding effects such as external hallucinations, delusions, and gustatory hallucinations. They are most commonly induced under the influence of heavy dosages of hallucinogenic compounds, such as deliriants and psychedelics. However, they can also occur under the influence of stimulant psychosis and sleep deprivation.

Gustatory suppression

Main article: Gustatory suppression

Gustatory suppression can be described as the experience of tastes becoming significantly vaguer, weaker, and less noticeable than that of everyday sobriety. At higher levels, this can result in food becoming completely tasteless and significantly less appealing.

Gustatory suppressoion is often accompanied by other coinciding effects such as tactile suppression and pain relief. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of dissociative compounds, such as ketamine, PCP, and DXM. However, it can also occur under the influence of depressants such as opioids and antipsychotics.

Olfactory suppression

Main article: Olfactory suppression

Olfactory suppression can be described as the experience of smells becoming significantly vaguer, weaker, and less noticeable than that of everyday sobriety. At higher levels, this can result in the smells becoming completely absent and significantly less impactful.

Olfactory suppressoion is often accompanied by other coinciding effects such as tactile suppression and physical disconnection. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of dissociative compounds, such as ketamine, PCP, and DXM.

See also