Talk:Lamotrigine

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Summary sheet: Lamotrigine
Lamotrigine
DMT.svg
Chemical Nomenclature
Common names DMT, Dimethyltryptamine, Dmitri
Substitutive name N,N-Dimethyltryptamine
Systematic name 2-(1H-Indol-3-yl)-N,N-dimethylethanamine
Class Membership
Psychoactive class Psychedelic
Chemical class Tryptamine
Routes of Administration

WARNING: Always start with lower doses due to differences between individual body weight, tolerance, metabolism, and personal sensitivity. See responsible use section.



Oral
Dosage
Bioavailability x% - y%[1]
Threshold x - mg
Light x - y mg
Common x - y mg
Strong x - y mg
Heavy x mg +
Duration
Total x - y hours
Onset x - y minutes
Come up x - y minutes
Peak x - y hours
Offset x - y hours
After effects x - y hours


Sublingual
Dosage
Bioavailability x% - y%
Threshold x - mg
Light x - y mg
Common x - y mg
Strong x - y mg
Heavy x mg +
Duration
Total a - b hours
Onset a - b minutes
Come up a - b minutes
Peak a - b hours
Offset a - b hours
After effects a - b hours







DISCLAIMER: PW's dosage information is gathered from users and resources for educational purposes only. It is not a recommendation and should be verified with other sources for accuracy.


Lamotrigine, sold as the brand name Lamictal among others, is a medication used to treat epilepsy and stabilize mood in bipolar disorder.[2] For epilepsy, this includes focal seizures, tonic-clonic seizures, and seizures in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.[2] In bipolar disorder, lamotrigine has not been shown to reliably treat acute depression; but for patients with bipolar disorder who are not currently symptomatic, it appears to be effective in reducing the risk of future episodes of depression.[3]

Common side effects include nausea, sleepiness, headache, vomiting, trouble with coordination, and rash.[2] Serious side effects include lack of red blood cells, increased risk of suicide, Stevens–Johnson syndrome, and allergic reactions.[2] Concerns exist that use during pregnancy or breastfeeding may result in harm.[4] Lamotrigine is a phenyltriazine, making it chemically different from other anticonvulsants.[2] Its mechanism of action is not clear, but it appears to inhibit release of excitatory neurotransmitters via voltage-sensitive sodium channels and voltage-gated calcium channels in neurons.[2][5] [6]

Lamotrigine was first marketed in the United Kingdom in 1991, and approved for use in the United States in 1994.[2][7] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines.[8] In 2019, it was the 71st most commonly prescribed medication in the United States, with more than 10Template:Nbspmillion prescriptions.[9][10]

History and culture

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Chemistry

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Lamotrigine is a member of the sodium channel blocking class of antiepileptic drugs.[67] This may suppress the release of glutamate and aspartate, two dominant excitatory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system.[68] It is generally accepted to be a member of the sodium channel blocking class of antiepileptic drugs,[69] but it could have additional actions, since it has a broader spectrum of action than other sodium channel antiepileptic drugs such as phenytoin and is effective in the treatment of the depressed phase of bipolar disorder, whereas other sodium channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs are not, possibly on account of its sigma receptor activity. In addition, lamotrigine shares few side effects with other, unrelated anticonvulsants known to inhibit sodium channels, which further emphasizes its unique properties.[70]

Subjective effects

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As such, it is still in progress and may contain incomplete or wrong information.

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Disclaimer: The effects listed below cite the Subjective Effect Index (SEI), an open research literature based on anecdotal user reports and the personal analyses of PsychonautWiki contributors. As a result, they should be viewed with a healthy degree of skepticism.

It is also worth noting that these effects will not necessarily occur in a predictable or reliable manner, although higher doses are more liable to induce the full spectrum of effects. Likewise, adverse effects become increasingly likely with higher doses and may include addiction, severe injury, or death ☠. {{effects/base

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Physical effects
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Visual effects
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Auditory effects
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Multi-sensory effects
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Transpersonal effects
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Experience reports

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Toxicity and harm potential

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As a result, it may contain incomplete or even dangerously wrong information! You can help by expanding upon or correcting it.
Note: Always conduct independent research and use harm reduction practices if using this substance.

It is strongly recommended that one use harm reduction practices when using this substance.

Lethal dosage

Tolerance and addiction potential

Dangerous interactions

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This dangerous interactions section is a stub.

As such, it may contain incomplete or invalid information. You can help by expanding upon or correcting it.

Warning: Many psychoactive substances that are reasonably safe to use on their own can suddenly become dangerous and even life-threatening when combined with certain other substances. The following list provides some known dangerous interactions (although it is not guaranteed to include all of them).

Always conduct independent research (e.g. Google, DuckDuckGo, PubMed) to ensure that a combination of two or more substances is safe to consume. Some of the listed interactions have been sourced from TripSit.

Legal status

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See also

External links

(List along order below)

Literature

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Please see the citation formatting guide if you need assistance properly formatting citations.

References

  1. APA formatted citation.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 "Lamotrigine". The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Retrieved 8 December 2017. 
  3. "Lamotrigine: Its Role in Bipolar Disorder". PsychiatricTimes. Retrieved 1 September 2020. 
  4. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named Drugs.com pregnancy
  5. "Lamotrigine". PubChem Open Chemistry Database. US: National Institutes of Health. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  6. Goldsmith, David R.; Wagstaff, Antona J.; Ibbotson, Tim; Perry, Caroline M. (2003-10-01). "Lamotrigine". Drugs (in English). 63 (19): 2029–2050. doi:10.2165/00003495-200363190-00009. ISSN 1179-1950. 
  7. Shorvon SD, Perucca E, Engel J (2015). The Treatment of Epilepsy (4th ed.). John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated. p. 1321. ISBN 9781118936993. 
  8. World Health Organization (2019). World Health Organization model list of essential medicines: 21st list 2019. Geneva: World Health Organization. hdl:10665/325771Freely accessible. WHO/MVP/EMP/IAU/2019.06. License: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO. 
  9. "The Top 300 of 2019". ClinCalc. Retrieved 16 October 2021. 
  10. "Lamotrigine - Drug Usage Statistics". ClinCalc. Retrieved 16 October 2021. 

}}}

Summary sheet: Lamotrigine
Lamotrigine
DMT.svg
Chemical Nomenclature
Common names DMT, Dimethyltryptamine, Dmitri
Substitutive name N,N-Dimethyltryptamine
Systematic name 2-(1H-Indol-3-yl)-N,N-dimethylethanamine
Class Membership
Psychoactive class Psychedelic
Chemical class Tryptamine
Routes of Administration

WARNING: Always start with lower doses due to differences between individual body weight, tolerance, metabolism, and personal sensitivity. See responsible use section.



Oral
Dosage
Bioavailability x% - y%[1]
Threshold x - mg
Light x - y mg
Common x - y mg
Strong x - y mg
Heavy x mg +
Duration
Total x - y hours
Onset x - y minutes
Come up x - y minutes
Peak x - y hours
Offset x - y hours
After effects x - y hours


Sublingual
Dosage
Bioavailability x% - y%
Threshold x - mg
Light x - y mg
Common x - y mg
Strong x - y mg
Heavy x mg +
Duration
Total a - b hours
Onset a - b minutes
Come up a - b minutes
Peak a - b hours
Offset a - b hours
After effects a - b hours







DISCLAIMER: PW's dosage information is gathered from users and resources for educational purposes only. It is not a recommendation and should be verified with other sources for accuracy.


For tips on how to properly format a substance article, please refer to this document: Content Style Guide - Substance

History and culture

History icon.svg

This History and culture section is a stub.

As a result, it may contain incomplete or wrong information. You can help by expanding it.

Chemistry

Molecule.svg

This chemistry section is incomplete.

You can help by adding to it.

Pharmacology

Lamotrigine is a member of the sodium channel blocking class of antiepileptic drugs.This may suppress the release of glutamate and aspartate, two dominant excitatory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system.It is generally accepted to be a member of the sodium channel blocking class of antiepileptic drugs, but it could have additional actions, since it has a broader spectrum of action than other sodium channel antiepileptic drugs such as phenytoin and is effective in the treatment of the depressed phase of bipolar disorder, whereas other sodium channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs are not, possibly on account of its sigma receptor activity. In addition, lamotrigine shares few side effects with other, unrelated anticonvulsants known to inhibit sodium channels, which further emphasizes its unique properties.

Subjective effects

Metacogghjgjvghnition.png
This subjective effects section is a stub.

As such, it is still in progress and may contain incomplete or wrong information.

You can help by expanding or correcting it.

Disclaimer: The effects listed below cite the Subjective Effect Index (SEI), an open research literature based on anecdotal user reports and the personal analyses of PsychonautWiki contributors. As a result, they should be viewed with a healthy degree of skepticism.

It is also worth noting that these effects will not necessarily occur in a predictable or reliable manner, although higher doses are more liable to induce the full spectrum of effects. Likewise, adverse effects become increasingly likely with higher doses and may include addiction, severe injury, or death ☠.

Physical effects
Child.svg

Visual effects
Eye.svg

Cognitive effects
User.svg

Auditory effects
Volume-up.svg

Multi-sensory effects
Gears.svg

Transpersonal effects
Infinity4.svg

Experience reports

There are currently 0 experience reports which describe the effects of this substance in our experience index.

Additional experience reports can be found here:

Toxicity and harm potential

Ambulance2.png

This toxicity and harm potential section is a stub.

As a result, it may contain incomplete or even dangerously wrong information! You can help by expanding upon or correcting it.
Note: Always conduct independent research and use harm reduction practices if using this substance.

It is strongly recommended that one use harm reduction practices when using this substance.

Lethal dosage

Tolerance and addiction potential

Dangerous interactions

Ambulance2.png

This dangerous interactions section is a stub.

As such, it may contain incomplete or invalid information. You can help by expanding upon or correcting it.

Warning: Many psychoactive substances that are reasonably safe to use on their own can suddenly become dangerous and even life-threatening when combined with certain other substances. The following list provides some known dangerous interactions (although it is not guaranteed to include all of them).

Always conduct independent research (e.g. Google, DuckDuckGo, PubMed) to ensure that a combination of two or more substances is safe to consume. Some of the listed interactions have been sourced from TripSit.

Legal status

Handcuffs-300px.png

This legality section is a stub.

As such, it may contain incomplete or wrong information. You can help by expanding it.

See also

External links

(List along order below)

Literature

  • APA formatted reference

Please see the citation formatting guide if you need assistance properly formatting citations.

References

  1. APA formatted citation.