Auditory effects

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Auditory effects can be defined as any effect which affects one's sense of hearing.

This page lists and describes the various auditory effects which can occur under the influence of certain psychoactive compounds such as hallucinogens.

Enhancements

Main article: Auditory enhancement

Auditory enhancements can be described as an enhancement of the acuteness and clearness of sound. This can result in becoming extremely aware of all sounds around oneself with the perception of an enhanced ability to comprehend multiple layers of noise and to better identify their direction and location.

The most common manifestation of this effect is a greatly enhanced appreciation of music. This can allow people the experience of listening to songs in a level of detail that is unparalleled during everyday sober living.

Suppression

Main article: Auditory suppression

Auditory suppression can be described as the experience of audible sound becoming perceived as distant, quiet and muffled. This effect can significantly decrease both the volume of noise and the general level of quality in which it is perceived. That is, it is usually described to make comprehension and to pay attention to music and other sounds difficult.

Distortions

Main article: Auditory distortion

Auditory distortions can be described as the experience of perceived alterations in how audible sounds present and structure themselves.

These distortions can manifest in many styles, but commonly take the form of echoes or murmurs rising in the wake of each sound accompanied by fluctuating changes in pitch. This can intensify up to the point where sounds are consistently followed by a continuous reverberation, often rendering the original sound completely unrecognizable. However, it often quickly resets to base level and starts over if the source of noise is stopped or changed.

The experience of this effect can be broken down into three distinct levels of intensity. These are described and documented below:

  1. Mild - At this level, auditory distortions are subtle, quiet and spontaneous reverberation, echo effects, and changes in pitch to noises within the external environment. They are fleeting in their manifestation, underwhelming in their intensity, and easy to ignore.
  2. Distinct - At this level, auditory distortions become extremely noticeable, spontaneous echo effects and changes in pitch attributed to noises within the external environment. The distortions can be very long and drawn out in their manifestation and loud enough to become difficult to ignore.
  3. All-encompassing - At this level, auditory distortions become constant in their manifestation and impossible to ignore. The complexity of the resulting alterations quickly renders the original sound as unintelligible.

Examples

The audio clip above demonstrates how it may sound to listen to a lecture while undergoing the experience of level 3 auditory distortions.

This audio clip denotes level 3 audio distortions in a forest setting.

Hallucinations

Auditory hallucinations can be described as the experience of hearing spontaneous imaginary noises that either occur randomly or manifest in the place of noises that are subconsciously (or consciously) expected to happen. The most common examples of these include clips of sound such as imagined music, voices, tones and notes, but be also be an infinite variety of other potential noises that are stored within one's memory.

The experience of this effect can be broken down into three distinct levels of intensity. These are described and documented below:

  1. Partially defined embedded hallucinations - At this level, the hallucinated sounds lack clarity and may be indistinct, muffled, and difficult to make out. They are also only heard as embedded within real sounds occurring within the external environment. For example, one may hear music or voices embedded within the sounds of the wind, cars, and rain.
  2. Partially defined separate hallucinations - At this level, the sounds remain only partially defined, but are heard on a separate layer of their own instead of only manifesting themselves as embedded within other noises.
  3. Fully defined separate hallucinations - At this level, the sounds become fully defined in their clarity, meaning that the content of the hallucinations can be recognized and heard perfectly as if they were actually occurring externally.

See also