Talk:Phenylephrine

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Summary sheet: Phenylephrine
Phenylephrine
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Chemical Nomenclature
Common names Phenylephrine
Substitutive name Neo-synephrine, m-Synephrine, β-HO-N-Me-3-HPEA
Systematic name 3-[1-Hydroxy-2-(methylamino)ethyl]phenol
Class Membership
Psychoactive class Stimulant
Chemical class Phenethylamine
Routes of Administration

WARNING: Always start with lower doses due to differences between individual body weight, tolerance, metabolism, and personal sensitivity. See responsible use section.



Oral
Dosage
Bioavailability 38% - 38%
Threshold 3 - mg
Light 5 - 9 mg
Common 10 - y mg
Strong x - 59 mg
Heavy 60 mg +
Duration
Total 4 - 4 hours
Onset 20 - 20 minutes
Come up x - y minutes
Peak x - y hours
Offset x - y hours
After effects x - y hours



Insufflated
Dosage
Threshold x - mg
Light x - y mg
Common x - y mg
Strong x - y mg
Heavy x mg +
Duration
Total x - y hours
Onset x - y minutes
Come up x - y minutes
Peak x - y hours
Offset x - y hours
After effects x - y hours






DISCLAIMER: PW's dosage information is gathered from users and resources for educational purposes only. It is not a recommendation and should be verified with other sources for accuracy.

Interactions


Phenylephrine is used as a decongestant sold as an oral medicine or as a nasal spray. It is a common ingredient in over-the-counter decongestants in the United States.

Phenylephrine is used as an alternative to pseudoephedrine as a decongestant, whose availability has been restricted due to a potential for use in the illicit synthesis of Methamphetamine . Its efficacy as an oral decongestant has been questioned, with several independent studies finding that it provided no more relief to sinus congestion than a placebo.


History and culture

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Phenylephrine was patented in 1927 and came into medical use in 1938. It is available as a generic medication

Pharmacology

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Phenylephrine is a sympathomimetic drug, which means that it mimics the actions of epinephrine (commonly known as adrenaline) or norepinephrine. Phenylephrine selectively binds to alpha-1 receptors which causes venous and arterial vasoconstriction.

Subjective effects

Disclaimer: The effects listed below cite the Subjective Effect Index (SEI), an open research literature based on anecdotal user reports and the personal analyses of PsychonautWiki contributors. As a result, they should be viewed with a healthy degree of skepticism.

It is also worth noting that these effects will not necessarily occur in a predictable or reliable manner, although higher doses are more liable to induce the full spectrum of effects. Likewise, adverse effects become increasingly likely with higher doses and may include addiction, severe injury, or death ☠.

Physical effects
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Cognitive effects
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Experience reports

There are currently 0 experience reports which describe the effects of this substance in our experience index.

Additional experience reports can be found here:

Toxicity and harm potential

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Note: Always conduct independent research and use harm reduction practices if using this substance.

It is strongly recommended that one use harm reduction practices when using this substance.

Lethal dosage

The median lethal dose of phenylephrine taken orally at which 50% of participants die (LD50) for rats is 350mg/kg

Tolerance and addiction potential

Non-addictive with a low potential of abuse

Dangerous interactions

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The increase in blood pressure effect of phenylephrine may be increased by drugs such as monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, and hydrocortisone. Patients taking these medications may need a lower dose of phenylephrine to achieve a similar increase in blood pressure.

Drugs that may decrease the effects of phenylephrine may include calcium channel blockers, ACE inhibitors and benzodiazepines. Patients taking these medications may need a higher dose of phenylephrine to achieve a comparable increase in blood pressure.

Legal status

  • Australia: Phenylephrine is a Schedule 2 (Pharmacy medicine) drug.
  • United Kingdom: Phenylephrine is an OTC drug.
  • United States: Phenylephrine is an OTC drug.

See also

External links

References