Mimosa tenuiflora (botany)

From PsychonautWiki
(Redirected from Mimosa hostilis)
Jump to: navigation, search
Songbird-egg.svg

This article is a stub.

As such, it may contain incomplete or wrong information. You can help by expanding it.

Mimosa tenuiflora (botany)
Mimosa-tenuiflora-1024x767.jpg
Taxonomical nomenclature
Kingdom Plantae
Unranked Angiosperms
Unranked Eudicots
Unranked Rosids
Order Fabales
Family Fabaceae
Genus Mimosa
Species tenuiflora
Common nomenclature
Synonyms Mimosa hostilis
Common names Jurema Preta, Calumbi, Tepezcohuite, Carbonal, Cabrera
Constituents
Active constituents DMT

Mimosa tenuiflora (also known as Mimosa hostilis and Jurema) is a perrenial shrub indigenous to northeast South America, more commonly in lower altitudes. The dried root bark may contain up to 1.0 to 1.7% DMT[1]

It has been used by indigenous peoples of South America for use in Ayahuasca brews. It is typically combined with Banisteriopsis caapi or another plant source of beta-carboline MAOIs (specifically Reversible Inhibitors of MAO-A, or RIMAs such as the Harmala alkaloids).[2] It is also used as a source of DMT for extraction in modern times, and as an admixture for ayahuasca brews in both ancient and modern contexts.

Although no beta-carbolines have been detected in M. tenuiflora samples, it exhibits psychoactivity when taken alone, suggesting an alternate mechanism than the DMT it contains, which would otherwise be rapidly metabolized by the MAO-A enzyme, rendering it virtually inactive (at least from its DMT content).[citation needed]

Chemistry

In 2005 the alkaloid Yuremamine was isolated from root bark samples, and is considered the first compound in a new family of of phytoindole compounds.[3]

Gallery

References

  1. Encyclopedia of psychoactive plants. Botany, ethnopharmacology and applications. Aarau: AT-Verl. P. 15. ISBN 978-3-85502-570-1.
  2. Ayahuasca Analogues: Pangaean Entheogens (1995), ISBN 0-9614234-4-7
  3. Vepsäläinen, J. J.; Auriola, S.; Tukiainen, M.; Ropponen, N. & Callaway, J. (2005). "Isolation and characterization of Yuremamine, a new phytoindole". Planta Medica. 71 (11): 1049–1053