Fermented water

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Fermented water is a liquid containing exclusively water and approximately 15–17% ethanol. The ethanol fermentation is produced by a mixture of refined sugar dissolved in water, which yeast is added to. Fermented water is formed when the yeast have consumed all the sugar, so it does not contain a sweet reserve, which makes it taste completely dry. A refractometer can be used to control that it has zero must weight.

Fermented water ethanol fermentation is made by exclusively dissolving sugar, yeast, and water. Crude fermented water is formed when the yeast have consumed all the sugar, it should have zero must weight. Fermented water is finished after it has been clarified which will produce pure fermented water that is flax-colored with no discernible taste other than that of ethanol.

Distilled spirit like moonshine is often diluted with drink mixers. However, moonshine is illegal in most countries, and it may be contaminated with methanol.

Production

An easy way to produce fermented water is to obtain turbo yeast kits (contains Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain, enzymes, vitamins, and minerals) that instructs on the package the quantity of white sugar, and tap water needed.

  1. Mix the water and the sugar. Before next step, the sugar should be fully dissolved in water, which can be sped up with stirred warm water (a sous vide stick can be used), that is cooled back to room temperature (controlled by a thermometer), before the yeast is added.
  2. Let the solution ferment for 10 days, then clarified it to produce a tasteless 15% ABV water solution.
  3. An alcoholic hydrometer is used to determine the ABV, and water is added to cut down the ABV if desired.

Mixed drinks

Fermented water can be used as an ethanol base for concentrated drink mixers.

Alcopop

  1. The yeast fermented spirit is diluted with water until the ABV is 3–7%.
  2. The solution is then carbonated with a soda machine, and soft drink syrup is added.

See also

External links