UserWiki:David Hedlund/Entheogenic theories

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Ambrosia

In the ancient Greek myths, ambrosia (/æmˈbroʊʒə/, Greek: ἀμβροσία, "immortality") is sometimes the food or drink of the Greek gods, often depicted as conferring longevity or immortality upon whoever consumed it.

  • Robert Graves, in his foreword to The Greek Myths, hypothesises that the ambrosia of various pre-Hellenic tribes was Amanita muscaria (which, based on the morphological similarity of the words amanita, amrita and ambrosia, is entirely plausible) and perhaps psilocybin

mushrooms of the Panaeolus genus.

Amrita

Amrita (Sanskrit: अमृत, IAST: amṛta), Amrith or Amata, is a word that literally means "immortality" and is often referred to in texts as nectar. “Amṛta” is etymologically related to the Greek ambrosia[1] and carries the same meaning.[2] The word's earliest occurrence is in the Rigveda, where it is one of several synonyms for soma, the drink of the gods.

Haoma

Haoma (English pronunciation: /ˈhəʊmə/) is a divine plant in Zoroastrianism and in later Persian culture and mythology. Haoma has its origins in Indo-Iranian religion and is the cognate of Vedic soma.

Kykeon

Kykeon = Kykeon (Gr. κυκεών, from κυκάω, "to stir, to mix") was an Ancient Greek drink of various descriptions.

Manna

Manna (Hebrew: מָן‎ mān, Greek: μάννα; Arabic: المَنّ‎, Persian: گزانگبین‎), sometimes or archaically spelled mana, is an edible substance which, according to the Bible and the Quran,[1] God provided for the Israelites during their travels in the desert during the forty-year period following the Exodus and prior to the conquest of Canaan.

  • The Mystery of Manna: The Psychedelic Sacrament of the Bible

Soma

Soma (drink), a ritual drink of importance among the early Indo-Iranians, and in subsequent Vedic and greater Persian cultures