Talk:AP-237

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Summary sheet: AP-237

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Bucinnazine (AP-237, 1-butyryl-4-cinnamylpiperazine) is an opioid analgesic drug and one of the most potent compounds among a series of piperazine-amides first synthesized and reported in Japan in the 1970s.[1] Bucinnazine has analgesic potency comparable to that of morphine but with a relatively higher therapeutic index.

History and culture

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Bucinnazine was first synthesized and reported in Japan in the 1970s,[2] and later widely used in China to treat pain in cancer patients as of 1986.[3] The drug was initially claimed to be a non-narcotic analgesic.

Chemistry

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Pharmacology

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Studies have shown that bucinnazine, and similar acyl piperazines, are potent and selective agonists of μ-opioid receptor (MOR) with relatively low affinity for the δ-opioid receptor and the κ-opioid receptor.[4]

Subjective effects

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Disclaimer: The effects listed below cite the Subjective Effect Index (SEI), a research literature based on anecdotal reports and the personal experiences of PsychonautWiki contributors. As a result, they should be regarded with a healthy degree of skepticism. It is worth noting that these effects will not necessarily occur in a predictable or reliable manner, although higher doses are more liable to induce the full spectrum of effects. Likewise, adverse effects become much more likely with higher doses and may include addiction, serious injury, or death. {{effects/base

Toxicity and harm potential

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Note: Always conduct independent research and use harm reduction practices if using this substance.

It is strongly recommended that one use harm reduction practices when using this substance.

Lethal dosage

Tolerance and addiction potential

Dangerous interactions

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Although many psychoactive substances are reasonably safe to use on their own, they can suddenly become dangerous or even life-threatening when combined with other substances. The following list includes some known dangerous combinations (although it is not guaranteed to include all of them). Independent research (e.g. Google, DuckDuckGo) should always be conducted to ensure that a combination of two or more substances is safe to consume. Some of the listed interactions have been sourced from TripSit.

Legal status

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  • Sweden: Bucinnazine is a class I controlled substance.[5]

See also

External links

References

  1. Nishimura, N.; Kiuchi, M.; Kanetake, Y.; Takahashi, T. (1970). "Clinical exaluation of a new analgesic agent Ap-237". Masui. The Japanese Journal of Anesthesiology. 19 (6): 653–6. PMID 4916908.
  2. Nishimura, N.; Kiuchi, M.; Kanetake, Y.; Takahashi, T. (1970). "Clinical exaluation of a new analgesic agent Ap-237". Masui. The Japanese Journal of Anesthesiology. 19 (6): 653–6. PMID 4916908.
  3. Qing T, Zhi-Ji C, Wei-Ping W (1986). "Experimental Study on the Dependence-Producing Properties of Qiang Tong Ding (AP-237)". Chin. J. Clin. Pharmacol. (2).
  4. Barlocco, D.; Cignarella, G.; Greco, G.; Novellino, E. (1993). "Computer-aided structure-affinity relationships in a set of piperazine and 3,8-diazabicyclo3.2.1octane derivatives binding to the mu-opioid receptor". Journal of Computer-Aided Molecular Design. 7 (5): 557–71. doi:10.1007/bf00124362. PMID 8294946. S2CID 23360530.
  5. Swedish Government Council Legal Database (Swedish) http://rkrattsbaser.gov.se/sfst?fritext=AP-237&upph=false